RSA ‘Road Safety Authority’s’ Safety Videos

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RSA

The aim of the Road Safety Authority “RSA” is to save lives and prevent injuries by reducing the number and severity of collisions on the roads as is reflected in their maxim,         Working to Save Lives.                                                                                            The RSA works to improve road safety in Ireland by developing and implementing information and education campaigns to increase awareness of road safety and promote safer driving and safer practises by all road and pathway users.

RSA have launched a major video safety campaign featuring advice on the specific dangers winter weather presents to drivers and pedestrians.The team here at BellTime Magazine have all viewed  the RSA youtube page and we all agree that the RSA deserve credit for their concerted efforts in really getting the message of safer road and footpath practices out there.

http://rsa.ie/en/Utility/About-Us/What-we-do/

VISIT : http://rsa.ie/en/Utility/About-Us/What-we-do/

Objectives

RSA IRELAND aim at Providing a safe environment for all road users and promoting the efficient use of our road networks.

As part of their remit the RSA works to improve road safety in Ireland by:
 VISIT THE RSA PAGE  ON YOUTUBE …https://www.youtube.com/user/RSAIreland
https://youtu.be/VO4Fe-EZn-g?list=
PLi8nqrsVU6hvzmFBXTTAJqiUjDPaQaAqd

Pedestrian Safety

  • Always wear a pair of reflective armbands, high-visibility belt or other reflective or fluorescent clothing which will help you to be seen from a distance
  • Carry a torch on country roads 

Road-wise pedestrians are safe pedestrians. Find out how to put your best foot forward and stay safe on Irish roads.In 2008,49 pedestrians were killed and 1,124 injured on Ireland’s roads. That’s 18% of all fatalities and 12% of all casualties from road collisions in the country.

The basics

Although you can’t be responsible for the way people drive, you can take a number of steps to make yourself safer as a pedestrian:

  • Stop, look and listen 
  • Don’t try to cross the road between parked cars 
  • If possible, cross at a pedestrian crossing or traffic lights 
  • Never cross at a bend 
  • If there is a footpath use it 
  • If there is no footpath, walk/run/jog on the right hand side of the road, facing oncoming traffic and keeping as close as possible to the side of the road 
  • Walk no more than two abreast and if the road is narrow or there is heavy traffic, walk in single file 

Increase your visibility

More than two-thirds of fatal pedestrian collisions happen at night. Although you can hear a car coming and see its lights, the driver may not see you (and certainly won’t hear you).

To protect yourself make sure you:

  • Always wear a pair of reflective armbands, high-visibility belt or other reflective or fluorescent clothing which will help you to be seen from a distance
  • Carry a torch on country roads 

Sobering facts

Drunken pedestrians are a source of danger to themselves and other road users. If you have had one too many, don’t attempt to walk – hail a taxi, use public transport or get a lift from a (non-drinking) friend.

Pubs and clubs also have a responsibility to prevent intoxicated customers walking out on public roads where they could be hit by passing vehicles, or cause a crash through their own behaviour. To prevent this happening, bar staff or anyone serving alcohol should decide if the person is fit to walk. If not, they should arrange to get them home safely.

CYCLING ESSENTIALS

Cycling is a common means of transport in Ireland. It’s popular for several reasons: it’s great exercise, it’s cheap and it cuts down on travel time, especially during rush-hour.      But cyclists are also a vulnerable category of road user. Every year there are several cycling fatalities on Irish roads and countless collisions involving cyclists.

Cycle Safe with The RSAAs a cyclist, you can reduce your risk of death or injury by following some simple advice:

  • Never cycle in the dark without adequate lighting – white for front, red for rear 
  • Always wear luminous clothing such as hi-vis vests, fluorscent armbands and reflective belts so that other road users can see you
  • Wear a helmet
  • Make sure you keep to the left. Always look behind and give the proper signal before moving off, changing lanes or making a turn 
  • Follow the rules of the road, never run traffic lights or weave unpredictably in and out of traffic 
  • Maintain your bike properly – in particular, your brakes should work properly and your tyres should be inflated to the right pressure and be in good condition 
  • Respect other road users – don’t get into shouting matches with motorists; stop at pedestrian crossings; don’t cycle on the footpath 
  • Watch your speed, especially when cycling on busy streets and going downhill 
  • Steer well clear of left-turning trucks: let them turn before you move ahead

Cycling for children

Using a bike for the first time and learning to ride has been a rite of passage for generations of Irish children. Cycling is fun and sociable and, like swimming, a life-skill that stands to children in later years. Yet, like many activities, cycling carries an element of risk. Parents play an important role in minimising the risk by giving them proper guidance and instruction at an early age to ensure that basic safety rules are absorbed while young.

Do’s and don’ts of safe cycling for children

Do ensure they:

  • Cycle a bike matched to their height and experience
  • Wear a safety helmet
  • Use lights in dark or dusky conditions                                                                      Don’t allow them to
  • Cycle on public roads unsupervised (if under 12)
  • Wear loosely-worn scarves or other clothing that could get caught in the wheels or chain-set
  • Take unnecessary risks.

LETS ALL PLAY ARE PART IN HELPING THE “RSA” to save lives and prevent injuries by reducing the number and severity of collisions on the roads.

STAY SAFE STAY SEEN

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