At a Glance...

Law, legal services and patents

A person may have cause to make use of legal services multiple times in their lives. It could be while they’re buying a house, seeking compensation for an accident, being called as a witness in court or participating in jury duty. The profession itself is divided into two main areas, barristers and solicitors. A degree in law can also be well regarded by non-legal employers and opportunities exist for graduates that do not want to practise law.

Solicitors can either offer their services to the general public for a fee in a private practice or be employed in-house by the State or by large commercial companies and industrial organisations. In-house Solicitors provide their services to their employer only and may be specialists in specific areas.

Those that work in a private practice tend to be more general legal practitioners and give their services to public clients. The work of a Private Solicitor can vary greatly, they may provide legal advice for buying and selling property, act as an agent in commercial transactions, manage a court case on behalf of a client or represent a client in court, usually the lower courts.

2014 marked the first year that there were more women than men in a legal profession in any country in the world, with 4,623 solicitors and 4,609 male. The trend continued in 2015 with two out of three newly qualified solicitors in Ireland being female.

It takes three years to become a Solicitor in Ireland after completing a degree, typically in Law, from start to finish. Those without a law degree need to take a preparatory course to gain the necessary legal background. A trainee must complete the Law Society Entrance Exam. They must then obtain a two-year training contract with a qualified solicitor, after which they take the 8 month Professional Practice Course I, and then undergo 11 months of in-office training.

The apprentice then completes the three month Professional Practice II and then takes a further 10 months training. At the end of the process they are admitted to the roll and enrolled as a Solicitor.

Solicitors can either offer their services to the general public for a fee in a private practice or be employed in-house by the State or by large commercial companies and industrial organisations. In-house Solicitors provide their services to their employer only and may be specialists in specific areas.

Those that work in a private practice tend to be more general legal practitioners and give their services to public clients. The work of a Private Solicitor can vary greatly, they may provide legal advice for buying and selling property, act as an agent in commercial transactions, manage a court case on behalf of a client or represent a client in court, usually the lower courts.

2014 marked the first year that there were more women than men in a legal profession in any country in the world, with 4,623 solicitors and 4,609 male. The trend continued in 2015 with two out of three newly qualified solicitors in Ireland being female.

It takes three years to become a Solicitor in Ireland after completing a degree, typically in Law, from start to finish. Those without a law degree need to take a preparatory course to gain the necessary legal background. A trainee must complete the Law Society Entrance Exam. They must then obtain a two-year training contract with a qualified solicitor, after which they take the 8 month Professional Practice Course I, and then undergo 11 months of in-office training.

The apprentice then completes the three month Professional Practice II and then takes a further 10 months training. At the end of the process they are admitted to the roll and enrolled as a Solicitor.

Barristers are lawyers that specialise in advocating in court for a client and giving legal opinions. The job of a Barrister is more specialised than a Solicitors, who they often act as consultants for, and because of this they carry out more research than their counterparts.

There are approximately 2,300 barristers registers as members of the Law Library, most of which are in Dublin, but there are about 300 that practise outside the capital.

Barristers can be separated into two groups, Practising Barristers and Employed Barristers. Practicing Barristers operate as independent sole traders while Employed Barristers are hired by either companies or Government bodies, particularly the Office of the Attorney General. Occasionally they are hired by large solicitor firms.

Barristers are usually not engaged with directly by the client. Typically a person who requires legal advice must approach a solicitor first. If the issue is complex the solicitor may approach a Barrister on the client’s behalf.

To become a barrister a candidate must attend the Kings Inns. They must either have a law degree from third level education or receive a Diploma in Legal Studies from the Kings Inns itself. They then take an entrance exam to determine whether they can attend and, if successful, study a Barrister-at-Law degree for a year, or two year part time. After training they spend 12 months as an unpaid apprentice to an experience Barrister.

law society of ireland

The Law Society is the educational, representative and regulatory body of the solicitors’ profession in Ireland.

the law library of ireland

The Bar of Ireland is the term used to describe an independent referral bar that has a current membership of approximately 2,300 practising barristers. At the Irish Bar, you will find a pool of highly skilled advocates and specialists in many different areas of law. Barristers have the advantage of daily intense exposure to the litigation process as a result of which they build up considerable practical experience in cost-effective resolution of disputes while optimising the chances of a successful outcome for their clients. The services provided by the Irish Bar are available to assist whether the dispute resolution in question is located in Ireland or internationally.

Jobs from Indeed

LATEST REVIEWS

MIC

MIC HAS A 94% STUDENT RETENTION RATE

Mary Immaculate College offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, a theatre studies degree, primary teaching degrees and early childhood education degrees on its MIC...
EPA Story of your Stuff Competition

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This