Are students prepared for the real world?

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An interesting debate was brought up on the Ted-Ed Blogs about if our students are actually being prepared to face the outside world at school?

Personally, I would love to see more practical classes and lessons being introduced to schools across the country including things like, what are taxes? the importance of voting, how our government system works etc.

Is the modern youth of today less prepared to enter adulthood compared to older generations? Do you think parents are molly-coddling them?

Do you think schools should take on the responsibility to fill the gap and teach our children about the basics of life where parents might not have done so?

Realistically both parents and school should be working together to educate students. It should be both their responsibility to guide them and help them become independent young adults and fit for the real world.

I also understand that, although students may not see it, there is a certain need for the traditional classes like Biology, Algebra, Shakespeare etc. But there could be a balance between the two.

These topics could be reinvented and taught in new ways to show how these lessons can be used outside of the classroom. For example with Shakespeare you could reflect on the moral aspect of to not get so swept up in emotions and carry out such rash actions.

This could give students the best of both worlds.

Think and ask yourself whether you are a student, parent, teacher, whomever, are they capable of handling life after school? Will my peers cope in college? Could I cope away from home?

There should be topics such as a realistic discussion on sex ed taught, how to present yourself in an interview, how to manage your money and pay bills? Again these could be intertwined with the traditional subjects already being practiced in our schools.

An interesting point made in this debate was if you could design your own school, how would you do it? One particular person said they would create two main elements to theirs, to teach students about subjects they’re interested in and also teach them about things they will need for life after graduating.

To me, I would say that sounds like an ideal school and possibly one that students may actually enjoy learning from. It has been known that students who like certain subjects, of course, will absorb more information. It’s really a win-win for everyone. Don’t you think?

So, what are your thoughts on this? Do you think there should be something done to provide our students with the tools and education on how to survive out in the big bad world after leaving school?

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